Englisch

L1 English 

Introduction

The European Schools have the two objectives of providing formal education and of encouraging pupils’ personal development in a wider social and cultural context.

Formal education involves the acquisition of competences – knowledge, skills and attitudes across a range of domains. Personal development takes place in a variety of spiritual, moral, social and cultural contexts. It involves an awareness of appropriate behaviour, an understanding of the environment in which pupils live, and a development of their individual identity.

These two objectives are nurtured in the context of an enhanced awareness of the richness of European culture. Awareness and experience of a shared European life should lead pupils towards a greater respect for the traditions of each individual country and region in Europe, while developing and preserving their own national identities.

Its position as a global language means that English is vital for communicating with others in schools and in the wider world, and is fundamental to learning in other curriculum areas. Through studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that are necessary to participate in society and employment; pupils learn to express themselves precisely, creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively.

Literature in English is rich and universally influential. It reflects the experiences of people from many countries and societies and from different times; it contributes to individuals’ sense of cultural identity. Through its study, pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poems and plays as well as of non-fiction, media and multimodal texts, gaining access both to the personal pleasure and enlightenment that reading offers and to the world of knowledge and experience that it reveals.

Studying the patterns, structures, origins and conventions of English helps pupils understand how the language works and how to develop and improve their own use of it. Drawing on this understanding, pupils can choose and adapt what is appropriate to say and write in different situations, as well as appreciate and interpret the choices made by other writers and speakers.

Didactic Principles

The following didactic principles are intended to guide the teaching and learning of English LI:

  • communicative and intercultural competences are overarching learning goals; an integrated approach to teaching should be adopted, in which the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing should all have a place.
  • a variety of teaching methods and approaches should be used. A range of types of differentiation strategies is needed in order to meet the individual needs of all students;
  • students’ mistakes and errors should be viewed as an integral part of the learning process and be used constructively as a springboard for improvement;
  • students should be encouraged to draw on and extend their existing subject skills and learning strategies;
  • students’ individual strengths and weaknesses, their preferred styles and pace of learning and their social skills should be taken account of in planning lessons;
  • students should be helped to achieve independence in learning through using a wide range of learning materials, including digital and electronic resources.
  • approaches to teaching and learning should reflect the contextualised nature of language use, historically and socially, in order to enable students’ understanding of how language has developed as a system;
  • students’ sociolinguistic competence should be developed to make them aware of differences in linguistic register, language varieties, etc. so that they are able to use language appropriately in different contexts;
  • priority should be given not only to functionality in teaching syntax, morphology and vocabulary, but to creativity and to the use and recognition of imaginative uses of language and how these achieve particular effects.

The above list is neither exhaustive nor in order of importance.

Learning objectives

By the end of year 7, students should have achieved overall:

a) subject-specific competences in the narrower sense, i.e. the ability to elaborate a personal interpretation and to express different points of view using different sources of information and set texts or books covering a wide range of social, cultural, political and literary topics;

b) subject-specific competences in a broader sense, i.e. differentiated communication skills and interpersonal and social skills through engagement with and reflection on language, literature and media;

c) cross-curricular competences, i.e. the acquisition of learner independence and autonomy, including the development of metacognitive strategies and techniques such as academic writing and presentation skills in order to guarantee success in further/higher education.

Specific competences, which may be learnt and assessed separately or in combination, will be acquired throughout the student’s secondary education, from cycle 1 to cycle 3. They are:

  • reading;
  • writing;
  • arguing/reasoning;
  • language awareness;
  • interpretation;
  • subject/specialist;
  • critical thinking.

Learning objectives for the 1st cycle (S1-S3)

 By the end of the 1st cycle, the student should be able to:

  • read and understand written texts of appropriate lexical demand from a range of fiction and non-fiction sources, including electronic and digital media, identifying obvious linguistic, literary and presentational features and ideas;
  • write coherent texts in varying forms and structures on topics which express individual points of view, or describe personal experiences, impressions and ideas;
  • in speech or writing, present reasons and explanations for opinions and ideas in a variety of forms;
  • listen and respond appropriately to others’ spoken or written productions;
  • show some awareness of how language and literature relate to their social, cultural and historical setting;
  • show some awareness of how language changes over time and in different contexts;
  • begin to choose and use strategies to organise individual learning, applying a range of study skills and tools suggested by the teacher.

Learning objectives for the 2nd cycle (S4-S5)

By the end of the 2nd cycle the student should be able to:

  • read and understand written texts of increasing lexical demand from a range of fiction and non-fiction sources, including electronic and digital media, responding to and interpreting linguistic, literary and presentational features, ideas and concepts;
  • write coherent texts in an increasing range of forms and structures, and of increasing length and complexity, from impersonal as well as personal viewpoints;
  • in speech or writing, present developed reasons and explanations for opinions and ideas in a variety of forms and in different contexts;
  • listen and respond appropriately to others’ spoken or written productions, challenging content or expression when appropriate;
  • show increasing awareness of how language and literature reflect their social, cultural and historical setting;
  • show increasing awareness of how language changes over time and in different contexts;
  • choose and use effective strategies to organise learning, developing individual responsibility for identifying appropriate study skills and tools.

Learning objectives for the 3rd cycle (S6-S7)

By the end of the 3rd cycle the student should be able to:

  • read and understand written texts of complex lexical demand from a range of fiction and non-fiction sources, including electronic and digital media, analysing and evaluating sophisticated linguistic, literary and presentational features and ideas;
  • write complex and sophisticated texts, using appropriate forms, structures and registers, on a range of challenging topics;
  • in speech or writing, present supported, evidenced reasons and explanations for opinions and ideas, in a variety of forms, contexts and situations;
  • listen and respond appropriately to others’ spoken or written productions, challenging where appropriate and acknowledging successes;
  • show detailed understanding of how language and literature relate to their social, cultural and historical setting;
  • show knowledge and understanding of how language changes over time and in different contexts;
  • accept full responsibility for organising his/her individual learning, independently adopting a variety of appropriate study skills and tools.

Teachers for L1 English for 2019/2020

Classes Teachers
S1  F. Wiltcher
S2  F. Wiltcher
S3  F. Wiltcher /C.Munroe
S4 F. Wiltcher
S5 F. Wiltcher/P. Davey
S6 A. Higgins/L. Fryer
S7 P. Davey/L.Fryer

 

Programmes and Descriptors/ Attainment Criteria

 L1 English Syllabus and Attainment Descriptors